Tag Archives: parsley

Weekend Scrambled Eggs with Croutons and Herbed Cream Cheese

If you have a long weekend coming up (and I hope you do), perhaps you’re looking forward to it for the same reason I am—three opportunities, three days in a row, to enjoy an unhurried breakfast.  What luxury!Scrambled Eggs with Croutons and Herbed Cream CheeseTruth be told, these scrambled eggs only take five minutes longer to prepare than the standard sort, an investment that might even be thinkable on a weekday.  But those five minutes yield excellent returns: they give you a little crunch, a little creaminess, and a lot of herbaceous wake-up in your bowl. And yes, it’s really just scrambled eggs and toast, but if you have never crouton-d your toast into your scrambled eggs you are in for a nice surprise. Continue reading

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Winter Salad with Oranges and Oil-Cured Olives

I always find a brightly-colored salad to be uplifting in wintertime.  Lettuce may not be not a winter crop, but I like to overlook that fact and focus instead on salad as an opportunity to let winter citrus shine.  And at this time of year fresh herbs are starting to peek up in the garden, which is a perfect excuse to supplement your salad greens with generous handfuls of parsley.  The play of flavors and textures here—sweet, salty, bitter, crisp—will brighten any winter day.Green Salad with Oranges and Olives Continue reading

A Winter Salad with Celery and Parmesan

There are a lot of things I like about seasonal produce.   A summer peach, a fall persimmon, a winter tangerine, the first stalk of rhubarb: each is most perfect in its own moment.

But then there are times when I stick my fingers in my ears: “la la la la la, I’m not listening!”  Like when it becomes painfully apparent that lettuce is no longer in season.  Some things I just can’t survive the winter without.This is a green salad to brighten your winter, full of lemony zing, celery crunch, and the wide-awake flavor of flat-leaf parsley.  Continue reading

An Olive Oil-Oregano Sauce to Put on Everything

My fondness for herb-packed olive oil sauces is hardly a secret around here.  We made that parsley salsa verde recently, and the basil oil, and pestos of every stripe (here are cilantro, basil, arugula, and parsley, to name a few).

I have a conviction that good vegetarian cooking means layering flavor into your dishes during each step of the cooking process, and I find that bright herbal flavors, enhanced by olive oil and salt, are a welcome finishing touch to many dishes. Continue reading

Green Olive and Celery Salad

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Here’s a funny little thing, while we’re eating bits and bobs this week.  Not quite a salad, not quite a relish, full of flavor and crunch and brine and pop.

I found it via Lottie + Doof, where Tim says he found it in a Sicilian cookbook.  It’s kind of weird.  Whatever.  It’s great.We scooped spoonfuls onto the baguette rounds we ate alongside our shakshuka the other day.  I had a little pile of it beside my sandwich.  I daresay it could go right into a sandwich of the right sort quite happily.  Or serve it as part of an antipasto spread, of course.  Or just with a fork. Continue reading

Rustic Italian Parsley Salsa Verde

I would like to write a love song entitled “Five-Minute Sauces That Make it a Meal.”  “It” being whatever else you have to put on the table.  Whether it’s a salsa or a savory mayonnaise, a compound butter or a pesto, the key components of a great sauce are flavor, flavor, and flavor.  And the results are worth singing about.

This Italian parsley sauce delivers.  The basic recipe combines parsley, capers, lemon, a shallot, and garlic.  Maybe (hopefully) an anchovy.  You can vary it a million ways: give it body with day-old bread, add other soft herbs, swap red onion for the shallot and garlic, spice it up with chile peppers, add nuts or vinegar or fancy pickles.  Reduce the oil or leave it out altogether (in which case you’ll have more of a sprinkle than a sauce).  Whatever ingredients you choose, chop them up and smooth it all together in a slick of olive oil.  Serve over anything.We often make this sauce when we grill fish or vegetables, but I hear that it also complements meat nicely.  Drizzle it over steamed potatoes.  Dunk a crusty chunk of bread in it.  Whatever you do with it in the end, it will be worth the five minutes it takes to make. Continue reading

Parsley Pesto Toasts with Radishes

I love to cook.  The rhythm of chopping, the aroma dancing up from the pan, the colors and flavors and textures of food transformed by heat and human ingenuity.

I also love to not cook.  The ease of a salad fresh from the garden, a handful-of-this-handful-of-that pesto, a plum I pick from the tree and eat outside.

This flavorful recipe is not-cooking cooking.  It takes less than 5 minutes (including the pesto) and can be lunch or a snack for one, or you can make a platter of these pretty little toasts to serve at your garden party.  Invite me!

You do need a nice hearty bread, thinly sliced and toasted (you could rub it with olive oil first, sure, but I didn’t).  The pesto recipe is mostly parsley, so heap it on there.  Top with lots of thinly-sliced radishes for crunch and zing, and anoint your toast generously with flaky salt.If you’re in more of a cooking kind of mood today, allow me instead suggest these “green tartine” radish top toasts.  Can’t decide?  You could always make both together for a top-to-tail radish tasting.