Pear Muffins with Cardamom and Vanilla

The ways of the fruit trees are mysterious to me.  One year it’s a bumper crop of plums, this year just enough for one indulgent afternoon.  The apple trees are staggering under the weight of their fruit, but we only got one apricot.  And the pear tree, espaliered out of the way on our small city lot, produced its customary dozen pears.  Which yielded, after a little bit of cleanup and a lot of simmering down, one and a half cups of chunky pear sauce.

We made the most of it with these muffins.

Let me just admit up front that they’re more cake than breakfast, unless you can see your way to combining the two–in which case, I assure you, you won’t be alone.  The crumb is tender, the tops are crisp with sugar, and the muffins are fragrant with the heady scents of cardamom and vanilla. Pear Muffins with Cardamom and Vanilla: In a medium bowl, mix 2 c. flour, ½ tsp. baking soda, 1 tsp. cardamom, and ¼ tsp. salt.  In a standing mixer, cream 1 stick (1/2 c.) butter with 1 c. sugar, then add 1 egg, 1 Tbsp. vanilla extract, and 1 ½ c. pear sauce*.  Mix well, then stir in dry ingredients just to combine.  Transfer to well-greased muffin tins and sprinkle the tops of the muffins with turbinado sugar.  Bake at 350.  Start to check the muffins after 15 minutes.  They are done when a toothpick comes out with just a crumb or two attached.

*Make your own pear sauce by piling chunks of peeled pear into a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat.  Cook for a few moments and then decide if you need to add liquid: some pears will produce plenty of their own juice and others will need you to add a few Tbsp. of water or pear juice (or apple juice) to prevent sticking.  Cook until pears are tender, then mash them with a fork or potato masher (for a chunky sauce) or immersion blender (for a smoother one).  Reduce to desired consistency, then remove from heat.

About these ads

23 thoughts on “Pear Muffins with Cardamom and Vanilla

  1. Karen

    I have to agree with you about fruit trees. This year our orchard has very little in the way of an apple crop but the pear trees have a nice crop. The weather was perfect this spring when the pear trees bloomed but rainy later when the apple trees were in bloom. Bees don’t go out in the rain so blossoms don’t get pollenated. I’ll be trying your recipe…it sounds terrific.

    Reply
  2. mayihavethatrecipe

    I close my eyes and I can smell the sweet aroma or pears vanilla and cardamom… Perfect for the first fall days!

    Reply
  3. Allison

    These sound heavenly!

    A friend of mine just made pearsauce– which I’ve never made– and I recommended adding cardamom to the sauce, which he did… He also made a separate batch where he added ginger!

    Reply
  4. Alex

    You’ve got a point there. We always have tons of persimmons, not this year though [which is a relief, somehow: I won’t be having soup, main meal, dessert, licquor out of the fruit when I go to my parents] eheh

    Intrigued about the cardamom detail in the muffins with the pears. Must try it.

    Reply
  5. savorysaltysweet

    Oh, how lovely. These look delicious. We have a rather robust apple tree in our garden, but every year we secretly harvest Asian pears from the long branches of our neighbor’s tree that stretch into our yard. They never, ever pick the fruit themselves (I know! So weird), so I like putting them to good use myself. I’ll have to make these wonderful muffins.

    Reply
  6. Pingback: Pear muffins with ginger sugar « md kitchen

  7. theplumpalate

    I know the feeling of that customary dozen or so pieces of fruit – for all that waiting! Most years our plum tree gives us about a colander’s worth of fruit. Good for you for making he best of it!

    Reply
  8. Pingback: Spiced Pear Cardamom Butter « Putney Farm

  9. Pingback: LLove Those Fall Fruits, Especially Apples and Pears | thenewbaker.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s