Tag Archives: summer vegetable recipes

Tzatziki

There was great enthusiasm around here about the prospect of an Emmy Cooks bloopers reel, so today, for your enjoyment, I present a dish that didn’t turn out so well.

To be clear, I love the tzatziki recipe I’ve given you below–you can’t really go wrong with herbed yogurt sauces in my book.  Remember that cilantro yogurt sauce (and are you still making it as often as I am)?  The basil yogurt sauce?  This, finally, is the classic: yogurt and dill, with cucumber for crunch.  And it’s great. But I made the tzatziki as one component of an apparently ill-conceived riff on Eggs Benedict, which ended up not as great as it should have been.  It was good, but….  It was whole grain toast topped with silky sauteed chard, a poached egg, and this lemony-garlicky tzatziki, but it needed a little something more.  A drizzle of spicy butter?  A generous crumble of smoked salmon?  You tell me if you try.  I’ve already picked out a recipe from Ottolenghi’s Plenty for the next time I try an eggs-and-yogurt combination.

Unfortunately, I made this breakfast for my sister, thinking it would be a special send-off meal after two so-nice weeks together.  I was sad to say goodbye to her, but what a luxury to have so much time together when we live in different cities.  Thank you for coming, sis, and for all the fun and help!  Next time I will play it safe and express my breakfast-time appreciation with chocolate waffles instead.The consolation prize is having a bowl of the tzatziki in my fridge to enjoy in the coming week.

Continue reading Tzatziki (click for recipe)

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Fava Bean and Arugula Crostini

I love many vegetables.  Most vegetables, even.  But I do not love fava beans.

Sure, they’re the color of springtime.  And at their best, they do taste like something that color green should taste.  But they are so much work.  (Every year around this time, someone acts like it’s a new idea to grill whole fava beans, but that can’t really work.  Does that really work?)

So I only cook fava beans when they appear in my CSA box.  One or two pounds can be manageable if you have half an hour to kill: string the pods and pull them open, push out the beans with your thumb, simmer them for a few minutes, drain and run them under cold water, then peel the bean-skin from each and every individual bean.

Then see if you find yourself admiring the fava’s color and flavor, or if you find yourself vowing to just steam some broccoli next time.  If you forget your vow and find yourself with another pound of favas, though, this recipe is one of my favorites.

Continue reading Fava Bean and Arugula Crostini (click for recipe)